When Your Prophetic Dreams Look Impossible

by | Jul 5, 2016 | Woman

I’ve dreamed about going to Africa for years. I’ve devoured countless books and blogs written by African missionaries. I’ve talked about it, dreamed about it, waited for it.

My friends Dr. Cliff and Julie Pash from Advancing the Kingdom Ministries (ATK) lead several churches and a school in Uganda, and have invited me several times. This summer I finally got to spend two weeks with them.

Actually packing for the trip was exciting and surreal at the same time. I didn’t know what to feel. I knew enough to know that plans and expectations are fine, but that there are some things you can’t plan. I figured I would just go and see what happened.

Sure enough, some things went as I expected, and some things came as a total surprise. To narrow it down, here they are—five things I learned while in Uganda:

1. Dreams are worth waiting for.
Almost 10 years ago, the Lord told me I’d work with kids in Africa. That was great, but I didn’t know how to make that happen. In 2009, I met Dr. Cliff and Julie. It was a good connection, but I still couldn’t see a way to get from here to there.

As the years passed, the desire to go only intensified. I began feeling frustrated. Here I had this great dream with no idea how to make it happen. I wasn’t willing to just go. I wanted God to take the lead so his blessing would be on it.

Finally, at the beginning of 2016, I felt like this was the year. I still didn’t know exactly how, but the time of waiting was over. Now I could step out in faith.

Throughout the first half of the year I spoke several times with Dr. Cliff and Julie. I shared my hopes with trusted friends and got counsel from my church leaders. I found the money. And I prayed a lot: “If it’s not time yet, I’m willing to wait. But if we can do this, God, I really want to.”

Things began happening quickly. I was surprised at how many people wanted to help. I received multiple donations of toys, clothes, Bibles and other things. I was overwhelmed at how God demonstrated His approval for my trip.

As it turned out, I would be arriving just as the students would be returning to school from a break. As a special education teacher, I was very excited to work with children who are delayed or have disabilities.

The ironic thing is that type of opportunity didn’t exist when I first wanted to go. The school is only a couple of years old. By letting God set the timing of my trip, I arrived right when their new school was developing methods to help students who were falling behind. I was in the right place at the right time to add my particular type of experience and skills where they were needed.

I realized my time of waiting had actually been a time of preparation. The impatience I struggled with and jobs I had in the meanwhile taught me things I needed when I got there.

2. Kids are everywhere.

This is one of the funny things I learned. In talking to people in Uganda and the U.S., I found people in both places think kids are better “there.”

Friends in the States think African students are more dedicated because they realize school isn’t available to every child. My Ugandan friends assumed American students are better because they have so much more.

I did see some obvious differences: Most kids didn’t have shoes. Several of my students went home sick with malaria. All the children learn to work from an early age, carrying water, gathering firewood and tending to younger siblings.

But they are also the same as “my” kids here: Some pay attention in class and some goof off. They all like toys and games. They blossom with positive attention. And even those from the hardest backgrounds can learn when they are not just taught, but loved, as they are at ATK.

3. If you’re afraid, do it anyway.
One thing I didn’t expect to face in Uganda was fear. I highly anticipated this trip and was with familiar people. Yet almost the second I stepped off the plane, I got smacked with a strong feeling of fear and intimidation.

I prayed and it lessened a little bit. It never completely left, though, so I had to make a decision. I could let fear keep me from doing anything or I could just do it anyway.

Dr. Cliff and Julie gave me many opportunities, including teaching, preaching and praying for people. None of those were completely new to me. Yet in Uganda they were harder than they’d ever been.

I discovered how to just keep moving forward. If I felt like hiding in my room, I made myself go out. When I wanted to let someone else lead the lesson, I did it myself. When I bombed a speaking opportunity, I sucked it up and prepared so I could do better the next time.

This fear completely surprised me. I could have let it ruin my trip and prevent me from being of any help to ATK. I refused that option. Near the end of my visit I was given a chance to preach at two churches in one day and pray for the members. I was able to say, “Okay, let’s do this.”

Even though the discomfort never let up, I kept going. When I returned to the U.S., I discovered my newfound strength and boldness stayed with me. “Doing it anyway” didn’t just help me those two weeks, it changed me forever.

4. Worship doesn’t require my understanding.
My absolute favorite times in Uganda were the worship nights. For two hours (or longer, for the overnight services), the leaders took turns singing and occasionally exhorting the people.

None of it was translated into English, so at first I stood at a distance. I enjoyed watching them sing and dance. Quickly I realized that wasn’t enough for me. I wanted to know what they were experiencing.

CHARISMA NEWSLETTERS

Stay up-to-date with current issues, Christian teachings, entertainment news, videos & more.

The latest breaking Christian news you need to know about as soon as it happens.

Prophetic messages from respected leaders & news of how God is moving throughout the world. 


MORE FROM CHARISMA

Troy Black Shares A Message to Help You Fight For Faith Again

Troy Black Shares A Message to Help You Fight For Faith Again

Young, old, rich or poor—nobody is immune to the feeling of brokenness. Jesus' life, death and resurrection on earth is a constant reminder that death no longer has a sting. Fear and hopelessness lurk throughout the earth trying to find an opportune moment to consume...

Kevin Sorbo’s Transformative Encounter as a Teen with Billy Graham

Kevin Sorbo’s Transformative Encounter as a Teen with Billy Graham

Actor Kevin Sorbo is known today for his roles in faith-based movies, like "God's Not Dead" and "Left Behind," but the iconic "Hercules" star's Christian roots took form at an early age. Sorbo recently told CBN's "Faith vs. Culture" he first read the prophetic book of...

7 Forms of Functional Cessationism

7 Forms of Functional Cessationism

In this article, cessationism refers to the doctrine, practice or belief that the ascension ministry gifts and the manifestations of the Holy Spirit ceased with the early church and do not function in the present church age (Eph. 4:11-16; 1 Cor. 12: 4-11). The...

Practical Tips to Maximize Your Time

Practical Tips to Maximize Your Time

We all have the same amount of time—four hours a day, seven days a week. And the longer I live, the more I discover that time is too valuable for us to waste any of it. That’s why it is so important that we learn to live on purpose, for a purpose. The truth is if you...

Enter the Courts of Heaven with Rabbi Curt Landry

Enter the Courts of Heaven with Rabbi Curt Landry

This article was first released by Curt Landry Ministries. Note: This is the first of a two-part series of articles. When you enter heaven's courtroom to do spiritual warfare, you are asking that the will of God, what is written in His books, be released from heaven...

RECENT ARTICLES

The Spiritual Awakening of Buffalo, New York

Monday night, Jan. 2, 2023, God drew our nation to prayer as Bills player Damar Hamlin experienced cardiac arrest on live tv. Could this have been the largest spontaneous prayer meeting in the...
Dr. Don Colbert: How This Every Day Ingredient is Killing Your Brain

Dr. Don Colbert: How This Every Day Ingredient is Killing Your Brain

Read Time: 4 Minutes 43 Seconds Of the many artificial sweeteners out there, such as aspartame, sucralose (Splenda), saccharin (Sugar Twin and Sweet’N Low) and neotame (NutraSweet), aspartame is one of the most common. How common? Aspartame is an ingredient in more...

Pin It on Pinterest