Elizabeth Moll Stalcup Articles

Straining to Be Perfect

I love nice clothes, so I noticed her right away. Her clothes were
casual but beautiful: crisply ironed khaki slacks, a print shirt and a
light sweater. Everything, even her belt and shoes, was perfectly
coordinated—just right for watching an afternoon soccer game.

At that moment, our sons were racing down the field in mad
pursuit of the ball, trying to score a goal for Faith Christian School.
As they neared the goal, the other team sent the ball back up the
field.

“Oh, Ben!” I heard her sigh in disgust. I turned to look
at her. Were we watching the same game? I hadn’t seen her son do
anything wrong.

Sarah’s Missing Shoe

Sammy,” I yelled downstairs to my 8-year-old son, “go get Sarah’s boot for me. It’s in the car.” We were running late.

A minute later he dashed up the stairs. “Mom, I can’t find it.”

Oh brother, I thought, how come no one else in this family can find anything? I knew that boot was in the car. Sarah had been wearing her snow boots when we went out last night.

Straining to Be Perfect

Straining to Be Perfect

I love nice clothes, so I noticed her right away. Her clothes were casual but beautiful: crisply ironed khaki slacks, a print shirt and a light sweater. Everything, even her belt and shoes, was perfectly coordinated—just right for watching an afternoon soccer...

Straining to Be Perfect

I love nice clothes, so I noticed her right away. Her clothes were casual but beautiful: crisply ironed khaki slacks, a print shirt and a light sweater. Everything, even her belt and shoes, was perfectly coordinated—just right for watching an afternoon soccer game.

At that moment, our sons were racing down the field in mad pursuit of the ball, trying to score a goal for Faith Christian School. As they neared the goal, the other team sent the ball back up the field.

“Oh, Ben!” I heard her sigh in disgust. I turned to look at her. Were we watching the same game? I hadn’t seen her son do anything wrong.

Hope for the Wounded Soul

Claudia could not believe what she was seeing. Just moments before, her three children had been playing happily in the family room while she fixed lunch. Now her 2-year-old son, Isaac, was dangling eight inches off the ground, eyes glazed, face purple and swollen. He was hanging from the cord of the mini blinds.

A Survey of Women’s Studies

Seminaries are beginning to support the calling of women to full-time ministry. Which institutions are on te forefront of this trend?

Jennifer Kemp was fairly certain God was calling her into the ministry, so to test the waters, she decided to take a weekend course at a seminary near her job in Boston. The class, “Proclamation and Communication,” had two women and 22 men.

“The first night,” Jennifer recalled, “one gentleman asked me why I was in seminary. I said, ‘I am not in seminary right now. I am taking this class to see if seminary is something I’d like to pursue in the future.’

Go to the Head of the Class

Many women today are returnign to school for ministry training. Should you? Here’s how to find the educational path that’s right for you.

At the age of 56, Joyce Shankland went back to school. As a recently divorced grandmother, she didn’t seem like a typical candidate. Two years earlier, her husband had left her for a 20-year old, and the following year had been a nightmare of pain as she worked through the grief of being abandoned by her husband of 36 years. During that time of grief, she endured a car accident, back surgery and internal bleeding.

But Joyce was undeterred. Ever since she had come to know the Lord at age 30, she had dreamed of being in full-time ministry. “I thought, Now is my chance, so in July of 1999 I came to Crossroads, a YWAM missionary training school on the island of Hawaii.”

The Wounded Dancer

“MISS JEANNINE” LACQUEMENT FINDS RESPITE FROM THE PAIN OF A DEBILITATING ILLNESS WHEN SHE TEACHES THE CHILDREN OF FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA, TO WORSHIP THE LORD THROUGH DANCE.

Agroup of 4- and 5-year-old children stand on the platform moving gently to the music and doing graceful sign language with their hands. They are watching their teacher, Miss Jeannine, who is leading them from the floor.

As they dance, their faces are lit by an inner light that speaks of a deep intimacy with Jesus. This is liturgical dance at its best–children dancing as an integral part of the service.

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